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  • SEPTEMBER 12: FRIDAY LINK ROUNDUP

    September 12th, 2014 · 12:50 pm  →  19th Century Art 20th Century art Art History Blog Conservation Modern Art

    Every Friday, we will post a list of some of our favorite art-related news and articles from around the internet. This Saturday (9/13), The Arts Club of Chicago presents, “My Kid Wouldn’t Even Do That!”: A Case for Difficult Art, this month’s installment of their series where speakers make a case for their favorite art form.Read the Rest…

    Recto/Verso and Vice Versa: The “Backstory” Behind a Famous Drawing

    April 18th, 2013 · 11:58 am  →  Art History Blog

                                        Recto and Verso are, or front and back, are common terms used when describing art. Although most of the time we appreciate a painting or a drawing from the front, the verso should not be dismissed. ARead the Rest…

    The Power of Provenance: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words

    April 15th, 2013 · 2:12 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    Every picture has a story. To be able to follow an image from its inception to its current-day location is an incredible example of provenance, or the documented story behind a piece of work. In terms of the art market, provenance is a means by which art experts can examine and verify authenticity and establishRead the Rest…

    Examining Authentications

    March 20th, 2013 · 10:37 am  →  Art History Blog

    In art and antiques, the authenticity of an object defines its value and importance in the trajectory of art history. Without legitimate provenance, or a sequence of historic records of the chronology of ownership, custody or location of an item, evidence of an object’s legitimacy can be seen as ambiguous and circumstantial. In these casesRead the Rest…

    Édouard Leon Cortès: Picturing Paris

    March 7th, 2013 · 12:11 pm  →  19th Century Art Art History Blog

    French post-Impressionist artist – born 1882 in Lagney-sur-Marne, France – is most famous for his romantic Parisian vignettes. Grandson to artist Antonio Cortès and son to Spanish Court painter Antonio Cortès, the virtuoso Édouard was inclined toward the arts in his youth and studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. When in 1901 theRead the Rest…

    Ruth Duckworth: The Metamorphosis of Ceramic Sculpture

    February 20th, 2013 · 11:00 am  →  Antiques Art History Blog

    Modernist sculptor Ruth Duckworth, born 1919 as Ruth Windmüller in Hamburg, Germany,  is widely recognized for her monumental, abstract ceramic works and large-scale wall sculptures. The artist, who was condemned to her house to improve her health as a child, was born to a Jewish mother, and so fled Nazi Germany in 1936 to studyRead the Rest…

    Pablo Picasso: The House Paint Pioneer

    February 15th, 2013 · 9:00 am  →  19th Century Art Antiques Blog

    The recent discovery by experts from the Art Institute of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory that Pablo Picasso used house paint to render his masterpieces further illustrates the artist’s innovative spirit and transcendent genius. The self-described “Picasso CSI” team of art Historians and scholars– who have long hypothesized that the artist’s invisible brush marksRead the Rest…

    Calder’s Late Lithographs

    March 28th, 2012 · 4:49 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    Alexander Calder (1898 – 1976) is best known for introducing the mobile sculpture to modern art, but his artistic production included everything from works on paper and paintings, to designing costumes, theater sets, and jewelry. He was born in 1891 in Philadelphia, the son and grandson of two well-known sculptors, and received a degree in mechanical engineeringRead the Rest…

    Roy Lichtenstein and the Rise of Pop Art

    January 25th, 2012 · 8:14 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    Roy Lichtenstein was a prominent American pop artist who was famous for creating works of art inspired by old-fashioned comic-strips. Lichtenstein’s work grew in popularity throughout the 1960’s and 70’s when his work was displayed in galleries alongside other leading figures of the pop-art movement such as Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and James Rosenquist. TheRead the Rest…

    A Captivating Look at Stained Glass

    June 6th, 2011 · 2:32 pm  →  Blog

    To answer last week’s trivia question: In 2008, the American Airlines terminal at JFK International Airport began to dismantle the stained glass window that had been on display for nearly 50 years. It had been considered one of the longest stained glass windows in the world, spanning 300 feet. The stained glass display at JFKRead the Rest…