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  • WHAT YEAR IS IT? DETERMINING THE AGE OF A PHOTOGRAPH

    Photography, like printmaking, can create prints again and again from a single source, sometimes years after the original negative or plate was first created. Therefore, it can be difficult to date a photograph from just looking at the front (recto). Three different, relatively vague, categories help distinguish the age of photographic prints compared to their negatives.Read the Rest…

    CELEBRATING MIR APPRAISAL’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY: THE POWER OF CONSERVATION

    February 14th, 2014 · 8:54 am  →  20th Century art Art Market Asian art Conservation Painting

    In honor of our 20th year in business, each month we will feature a favorite case from our history that demonstrates the importance of research throughout the appraisal process. This month’s installment focuses on the role that condition and conservation can play in determining a work’s true value. In 2011, MIR Appraisal received an inquiryRead the Rest…

    Conservation and Cleaning Reveal the Story Behind a Famous Pollock Painting

    June 4th, 2013 · 10:36 am  →  Art History Blog Conservation Modern Art Painting

    When a work of art comes to us to be appraised, sometimes a professional cleaning is needed to get a better idea of its value. Dirt and dust accumulated over years of neglect need to be removed to accurately assess the piece. Signatures, brushstrokes, and subtleties not previously evident suddenly spring into new life whenRead the Rest…

    Finders Keepers: Stolen Artwork Uncovered

    April 22nd, 2013 · 10:36 am  →  19th Century Art Art History Blog

    Marcia Fuqua, a 51-year old Virginia woman, unwittingly purchased an original painting by French Impressionist artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) for $7 at the Harpers Ferry Flea Market. News of the discovery made waves in the art world this month when an Alexandria auction house announced its intentions to sell the Renoir landscape, and a journalistRead the Rest…

    Recto/Verso and Vice Versa: The “Backstory” Behind a Famous Drawing

    April 18th, 2013 · 11:58 am  →  Art History Blog

                                        Recto and Verso are, or front and back, are common terms used when describing art. Although most of the time we appreciate a painting or a drawing from the front, the verso should not be dismissed. ARead the Rest…

    The Power of Provenance: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words

    April 15th, 2013 · 2:12 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    Every picture has a story. To be able to follow an image from its inception to its current-day location is an incredible example of provenance, or the documented story behind a piece of work. In terms of the art market, provenance is a means by which art experts can examine and verify authenticity and establishRead the Rest…

    Accidents Happen: Restoring and Maintaining the Condition of your Fine Art

    March 29th, 2013 · 2:08 pm  →  Art History Blog Collection Management

    The condition of your fine art is one of the most important variables in determining its value. During an appraisal, an expert inspects whether the original condition of the item has been preserved, and if it has not, to what extent it has been damaged. After assessing the overall appearance of the object, factors suchRead the Rest…

    Examining Authentications

    March 20th, 2013 · 10:37 am  →  Art History Blog

    In art and antiques, the authenticity of an object defines its value and importance in the trajectory of art history. Without legitimate provenance, or a sequence of historic records of the chronology of ownership, custody or location of an item, evidence of an object’s legitimacy can be seen as ambiguous and circumstantial. In these casesRead the Rest…

    The Importance of a Professional Eye

    March 13th, 2013 · 2:47 pm  →  Art History Blog

    There exists something in the art world called “connoisseurship.” It simply means the combination of knowledge, experience, and instinct that enables experts to discern a true work of art from the superfluity of fakes and imitators in the world. It is this quality that can elevate a simple sketch into a treasured part of history,Read the Rest…

    Masami Teraoka: New Views of Mt. Fuji/Sinking Pleasure Boat

    February 27th, 2013 · 12:45 pm  →  Art History Blog

    At first glance Masami Teraoka’s panoramic view of a rustic wooden boat filled with revelers and being overtaken by ferocious waves appears to be a traditional Ukiyo-E, or Japanese woodblock print. These colorful prints originating in the austere Edo period depicted the “floating world” of transient sensual pleasures of beauty, music, food, and drink. TheyRead the Rest…