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  • ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG: WORKING IN THE GAP BETWEEN ART AND LIFE

    July 10th, 2014 · 1:00 am  →  20th Century art Art History Artist Spotlight Blog

    Life Robert Rauschenberg was born in Port Arthur Texas in 1925, and he first began his academic career studying pharmacy at the University of Texas. However, after being drafted into the Navy in 1947 he soon realized his affinity for rendering images from life and creating artwork. This led him to pursue an education inRead the Rest…

    ALL-AMERICAN POTTERY: THE ART & HISTORY BEHIND ROOKWOOD POTTERY

    The United States of America has a long history of American-made art pottery companies. However, there are a small number of American pottery companies founded by women. Rookwood Pottery Company, founded in 1880, is just that. Rookwood, the first woman-owned manufacturing company in the United States, was started by Maria Longsworth Nichols Storer who ran theRead the Rest…

    WHAT YEAR IS IT? DETERMINING THE AGE OF A PHOTOGRAPH

    Photography, like printmaking, can create prints again and again from a single source, sometimes years after the original negative or plate was first created. Therefore, it can be difficult to date a photograph from just looking at the front (recto). Three different, relatively vague, categories help distinguish the age of photographic prints compared to their negatives.Read the Rest…

    Featured Artist: August Wilhelm Leu

    October 4th, 2013 · 4:58 pm  →  19th Century Art Appraisal Art History Blog Painting

    This week, we have decided to feature an important German artist by the name of August Wilhelm Leu (1819-1897). Born in Munster in 1819, Leu entered the Academy of Dusseldorf in 1840.  Although he was initially interested in engraving, he was profoundly influenced by the teaching of Johann Wilhelm Shirmer, whose focus was on landscapeRead the Rest…

    A Brief Primer on Pre-Columbian Art

    Incan Polychrome Jar from the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis Pre-Columbian Art is classified as the visual art of indigenous peoples living in the Caribbean and the Americas before the arrival of European influence (Hence the name, which references Christopher Columbus).  Art that was produced in these areas between 1200 BCE and 1500 CE is consideredRead the Rest…

    Finders Keepers: Stolen Artwork Uncovered

    April 22nd, 2013 · 10:36 am  →  19th Century Art Art History Blog

    Marcia Fuqua, a 51-year old Virginia woman, unwittingly purchased an original painting by French Impressionist artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) for $7 at the Harpers Ferry Flea Market. News of the discovery made waves in the art world this month when an Alexandria auction house announced its intentions to sell the Renoir landscape, and a journalistRead the Rest…

    Recto/Verso and Vice Versa: The “Backstory” Behind a Famous Drawing

    April 18th, 2013 · 11:58 am  →  Art History Blog

                                        Recto and Verso are, or front and back, are common terms used when describing art. Although most of the time we appreciate a painting or a drawing from the front, the verso should not be dismissed. ARead the Rest…

    The Power of Provenance: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words

    April 15th, 2013 · 2:12 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    Every picture has a story. To be able to follow an image from its inception to its current-day location is an incredible example of provenance, or the documented story behind a piece of work. In terms of the art market, provenance is a means by which art experts can examine and verify authenticity and establishRead the Rest…

    Damage and Insuring Art

    April 4th, 2013 · 2:32 pm  →  Art History Blog

                                 This past January and February, just a few months after the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy flooded parts of New York City, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) published a new map assessing the risk levels per neighborhood of possible future flooding inRead the Rest…

    Examining Authentications

    March 20th, 2013 · 10:37 am  →  Art History Blog

    In art and antiques, the authenticity of an object defines its value and importance in the trajectory of art history. Without legitimate provenance, or a sequence of historic records of the chronology of ownership, custody or location of an item, evidence of an object’s legitimacy can be seen as ambiguous and circumstantial. In these casesRead the Rest…