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  • Graffiti as Contemporary Art

    April 24th, 2013 · 1:16 pm  →  20th Century art Art History Blog Contemporary Art Street Art

    On April 4, 2013, the prominent New York City artist Kenny Scharf was arrested in Brooklyn while creating public art. Scharf was incarcerated because his composition, a signature squiggly snake in black and white spray paint, was deemed to be an illegal act of graffiti. Participating in acts of graffiti and/or possessing graffiti instruments (i.e.,Read the Rest…

    Finders Keepers: Stolen Artwork Uncovered

    April 22nd, 2013 · 10:36 am  →  19th Century Art Art History Blog

    Marcia Fuqua, a 51-year old Virginia woman, unwittingly purchased an original painting by French Impressionist artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) for $7 at the Harpers Ferry Flea Market. News of the discovery made waves in the art world this month when an Alexandria auction house announced its intentions to sell the Renoir landscape, and a journalistRead the Rest…

    Recto/Verso and Vice Versa: The “Backstory” Behind a Famous Drawing

    April 18th, 2013 · 11:58 am  →  Art History Blog

                                        Recto and Verso are, or front and back, are common terms used when describing art. Although most of the time we appreciate a painting or a drawing from the front, the verso should not be dismissed. ARead the Rest…

    The Power of Provenance: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words

    April 15th, 2013 · 2:12 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    Every picture has a story. To be able to follow an image from its inception to its current-day location is an incredible example of provenance, or the documented story behind a piece of work. In terms of the art market, provenance is a means by which art experts can examine and verify authenticity and establishRead the Rest…

    Lost Parmigianino Drawing Uncovered

    April 11th, 2013 · 2:03 pm  →  Appraisal Art History Blog

    A drawing by the acclaimed Italian artist Francesco (Parmigianino) Mazzola (1503-1540) was recently found tucked inside of a bible. The drawing, a sketch for Parmigianino‚Äôs masterpiece Madonna dal Collo Lungo (or Madonna with the Long Neck) was considered missing by the Huntington Library and Art Collections in San Marino, California for the last thirty years;Read the Rest…

    Damage and Insuring Art

    April 4th, 2013 · 2:32 pm  →  Art History Blog

                                 This past January and February, just a few months after the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy flooded parts of New York City, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) published a new map assessing the risk levels per neighborhood of possible future flooding inRead the Rest…