• Blog
  • Masami Teraoka: New Views of Mt. Fuji/Sinking Pleasure Boat

    February 27th, 2013 · 12:45 pm  →  Art History Blog

    At first glance Masami Teraoka’s panoramic view of a rustic wooden boat filled with revelers and being overtaken by ferocious waves appears to be a traditional Ukiyo-E, or Japanese woodblock print. These colorful prints originating in the austere Edo period depicted the “floating world” of transient sensual pleasures of beauty, music, food, and drink. TheyRead the Rest…

    Ruth Duckworth: The Metamorphosis of Ceramic Sculpture

    February 20th, 2013 · 11:00 am  →  Antiques Art History Blog

    Modernist sculptor Ruth Duckworth, born 1919 as Ruth Windmüller in Hamburg, Germany,  is widely recognized for her monumental, abstract ceramic works and large-scale wall sculptures. The artist, who was condemned to her house to improve her health as a child, was born to a Jewish mother, and so fled Nazi Germany in 1936 to studyRead the Rest…

    Pablo Picasso: The House Paint Pioneer

    February 15th, 2013 · 9:00 am  →  19th Century Art Antiques Blog

    The recent discovery by experts from the Art Institute of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory that Pablo Picasso used house paint to render his masterpieces further illustrates the artist’s innovative spirit and transcendent genius. The self-described “Picasso CSI” team of art Historians and scholars– who have long hypothesized that the artist’s invisible brush marksRead the Rest…

    LeRoy Neiman’s Lincoln in Living Color

    February 14th, 2013 · 5:08 pm  →  Blog

      In honor of Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday we are celebrating LeRoy Neiman’s 1968 color serigraph depicting President Abraham Lincoln in a brilliant palette of rainbow colored hues. Composed with dynamic gestural marks, the artist sketches Lincoln in his unique Expressionistic style. Neiman employs blues, greens and reds to express shadows throughout his subject’s face, andRead the Rest…